What is ‘Open Interest’

Open interest is the total number of open or outstanding (not closed or delivered) options and/or futures contracts that exist on a given day.

Example quotes page

BREAKING DOWN ‘Open Interest’

For every seller of a futures or option contract, there must also be a buyer of the contract. One seller and one buyer together create one contract. Therefore, the total open interest in the market for a specified futures or option market equals the total number of buyers or the total number of sellers, not the total of both added together.

Open interest of the futures and options markets is sometimes confused with trading volume, but the two terms refer to distinctly different measures. For example, on a day when one trader who already holds 10 option contracts sells those 10 option contracts to a new trader entering the market, the transfer of contracts does not create any change in the open interest figure for that particular option; no new option contracts have been added to the market. However, the sale of the 10 option contracts by the existing option holder to an option buyer does increase the trading volume figure for the day by 10 contracts. The open interest number only changes when a new buyer and seller enter the market, creating a new contract.

The Importance of Open Interest

Open interest is a measure of the flow of money into a futures or options market. Increasing open interest represents new or additional money coming into the market, while decreasing open interest indicates money flowing out of the market. An increase in open interest is typically interpreted as a bullish signal, while decreasing open interest figures are generally interpreted as a bearish sign.

Open interest is also used as a momentum indicator of trend strength. Since rising open interest represents additional money coming into a market, indicating increased interest in the market by investors, it is generally interpreted to be an indication that the existing market trend is gaining momentum and is likely to continue. Conversely, decreasing open interest reflects declining interest on the part of investors and waning momentum, indicating that the existing trend may soon be exhausted, leading to a trend change.

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Privacy Notice

Disclosure

Risk Disclosure

PROGRAM AVAILABILITY IS DEPENDENT ON YOUR COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE AND FINANCIAL STATUS.

PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE PERFORMANCE. THE RISK OF LOSS IN TRADING THE CASH MARKET, FOREX, FUTURES CONTRACTS OR OPTIONS CAN BE SUBSTANTIAL AND THEREFORE INVESTORS SHOULD UNDERSTAND THE RISKS INVOLVED IN TAKING POSITIONS. INVESTORS MUST ASSUME RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH SUCH INVESTMENTS.

BID/ASK SPREADS, COMMISSION, CLEARING, EXCHANGE AND REGULATORY FEES WILL HAVE AN ADVERSE IMPACT ON THE NET OVERALL PERFORMANCE OF YOUR ACCOUNT. PRIOR TO MAKING A DECISION TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY INVESTMENT MAKE SURE YOU FULLY UNDERSTAND THE FEES ASSOCIATED WITH TRADING.

EXAMPLES OF HISTORIC PRICE MOVES OR EXTREME MARKET CONDITIONS ARE NOT MEANT TO IMPLY THAT SUCH MOVES OR CONDITIONS ARE COMMON OCCURRENCES OR ARE LIKELY TO OCCUR.

ACTUAL PERFORMANCE IS NO GUARANTEE OF FUTURE RESULTS

HYPOTHETICAL PERFORMANCE RESULTS HAVE MANY INHERENT LIMITATIONS, SOME OF WHICH ARE DESCRIBED BELOW. NO REPRESENTATION IS BEING MADE THAT ANY ACCOUNT WILL OR IS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE PROFITS OR LOSSES SIMILAR TO THOSE SHOWN IN FACT, THERE ARE FREQUENTLY SHARP DIFFERENCES BETWEEN HYPOTHETICAL PERFORMANCE RESULTS AND THE ACTUAL RESULTS SUBSEQUENTLY ACHIEVED BY ANY PARTICULAR TRADING PROGRAM. ONE OF THE LIMITATIONS OF HYPOTHETICAL PERFORMANCE RESULTS IS THAT THEY ARE GENERALLY PREPARED WITH THE BENEFIT OF HINDSIGHT.

YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY CONSIDER WHETHER TRADING IS SUITABLE FOR YOU IN LIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES.

THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS REPORT CONTAINS RESEARCH, MARKET COMMENTARY AND TRADE RECOMMENDATIONS. IT SHOULD BE KNOWN THAT THE REPRESENTATIVES OF OUR FIRM MAY TRADE FUTURES AND OPTIONS FOR THEIR OWN ACCOUNTS OR THOSE OF OTHERS. DUE TO VARIOUS FACTORS (SUCH AS MARGIN REQUIREMENTS, RISK FACTORS, TRADING OBJECTIVES, TRADING INSTRUCTIONS, TRADING STRATEGIES AND OTHER FACTORS) SUCH TRADING MAY RESULT IN THE LIQUIDATION OR INITIATION OF FUTURES OR OPTIONS POSITIONS THAT DIFFER FROM THE OPINIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOUND IN THIS REPORT.

Privacy Notice

Automated Trading Accounts (ATA’s) what they are and how they work

1) Automated Trading Accounts (ATA’s) what they are and how they work

Currency ATA Performance Homepage    Currency ATA Aggressive Homepage

2.1) As our ATA Client you maintain control of

  • The market(s) you trade and when
  • The methodologies you trade
  • The level of leverage that suits your risk tolerance
  • The overall risk for your account

2.2) ATA Team responsibilities include

  • Calculating entries, risk levels and profit objectives
  • Placing all orders and diligently overseeing executions, positions and balance
  • Monitoring total account risk to ensure it is within your defined guidelines
  • Ensuring everything is done correctly and assuming liability if it’s not
  • Answering all your questions on markets and methodologies

2.3) About this ATA

  • This ATA uses fully disclosed trading methodology
  • Trades with the trend long or short
  • Uses option collars that define risk on every trade and duration of every trading period
  • Trades in this ATA cannot be stopped out regardless of market volatility
  • The only way a position can be called away is at a profit
  • If the market stays the same this ATA hasn’t wasted precious investment capital on purchasing option time premium as it’s collecting approximately as much time premium on the covered writes at the profit objectives, as it’s paying out on the purchased options that define maximum trade risk
  • Option collars can be offset at any time locking in gains and/or modified to capture more of the move or, reversed to capture a trend reversal.
  • Mark-to-market positions and balance are available online at any time
  • Statements are emailed daily disclosing positions, liquidating value and any trading activity
  • Monthly statements summarize all activity and end of month balance
  • Liquidity for ATA accounts in portion or all is 2 to 48 hours in any major currency
  • AIM ATA’s afford you the opportunity to modify markets, units you trade and your overall account risk level at any time
  • Currency Quotes and essentials for trading
  • Additional Currency guides, reports and videos
  • Other markets we trade ATA’s on in North America and Europe
  • Contact us with your questions
  • Schedule an online review

 

Currency Analysis Page

1) Euro-FX – Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (E6)

1.1) 15 year chart using monthly data
1.2) 7 year chart, monthly Data
1.3) 3 year chart, weekly data
1.4) 1 year chart, weekly data
1.5)
9 month chart, daily data

1.6) 3 month chart, daily data
1.7)
5 day chart 60 minute data
1.8) 1 day chart, 10 minute data
1.9) Today’s Technical Opinion
1.10) Ranges & Price Performance
1.11) Support & Resistance
1.12) Barchart Quotes, All Deliveries
1.13) Barchart Options Quotes
1.14) CME Futures Quotes, All Deliveries
1.15) CME Option Quotes

1.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $12.50
1.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 125,000 Euro FX
1.18) EUR Collar Spreadsheet

2) British Pound – Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (B6)

2.1) 15 year chart using monthly data
2.2) 7 year Chart, monthly Data
2.3) 3 year chart, weekly data
2.4) 1 year chart, weekly data
2.5)
9 month chart, daily data

2.6) 3 month chart, daily data
2.7)
5 day chart 60 minute data

2.8) 1 day chart, 10 minute data
2.9) Today’s Technical Opinion
2.10) Ranges & Price Performance
2.11) Support & Resistance
2.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
2.13) Barchart Options Quotes
2.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries

2.15) CME Option Quotes
2.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $6.25
2.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 62,500 Pounds
2.18) GBP Collar Spreadsheet

3) Japanese Yen Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (J6)

3.1) 15 Year chart using monthly data
3.2) 7 Year Chart, monthly Data
3.3) 3 Year chart, weekly data
3.4) 1 year chart, weekly data
3.5)
9 month chart, daily data

3.6) 3 month chart, daily data
3.7)
5 day chart, 60 minute data

3.8) 1 day chart, 10 minute data
3.9) Today’s Technical Opinion
3.10) Ranges & Price Performance
3.11) Support & Resistance
3.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
3.13) Barchart Options Quotes
3.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
3.15) CME Option Quotes

3.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $12.50
3.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 12,500,000 Yen
3.18) JPY Collar Spreadsheet

4) Australian Dollar Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (A6)

4.1) 15 Year chart using monthly data
4.2) 7 Year Chart, monthly Data
4.3) 3 Year chart, weekly data
4.4) 1 year chart, weekly data
4.5)
9 month chart, daily data

4.6) 3 month chart, daily data
4.7)
5 day chart 60 minute data

4.8) 1 day chart, 10 minute data
4.9) Today’s Technical Opinion
4.10) Ranges & Price Performance
4.11) Support & Resistance
4.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
4.13) Barchart Options Quotes
4.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
4.15) CME Option Quotes
4.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $10.00
4.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 100,000 Australian
4.18) AUD Collar Spreadsheet

5) Canadian Dollar Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (D6)

5.1) 15 Year chart using monthly data
5.2) 7 Year Chart, monthly Data
5.3) 3 Year chart, weekly data
5.4) 1 year chart, weekly data
5.5)
9 month chart, daily data

5.6) 3 month chart, daily data
5.7)
5 day chart 60 minute data

5.8) 1 day chart, 10 minute data
5.9) Today’s Technical Opinion
5.10) Ranges & Price Performance
5.11) Support & Resistance
5.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
5.13) Barchart Options Quotes
5.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
5.15) CME Option Quotes
5.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $10.00
5.17) Exchange margin requirement per 100,000 Canadian
5.18) CAD Collar Spreadsheet

6) Swiss Franc Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (S6) (not traded)

6.1) 15 Year chart using monthly data
6.2) 7 Year Chart, monthly Data
6.3) 3 Year chart, weekly data
6.4) 1 year chart, weekly data
6.5)
9 month chart, daily data

6.6) 3 month chart, daily data
6.7)
5 day chart 60 minute data

6.8) 1 day chart, 10 minute data
6.9) Today’s Technical Opinion
6.10) Ranges & Price Performance
6.11) Support & Resistance
6.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
6.13) Barchart Options Quotes
6.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
6.15) CME Option Quotes

6.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $12.50
6.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 125,000 Swiss

8) Program Structure and Account Opening Procedure

8.1) (ATA’s), What They Are and How They Work
8.2) The Fee Structure For This Program
8.3) Defining Overall Risk For Your Account
8.4) How Balances Are Guaranteed Plus or Minus Trading
8.5) How To Open An Account

9) Major Curencies Priced In Gold

9.1) Gold GBP +334.23%
9.2) Gold USD +279.19%
9.3) Gold EUR +254.05%
9.4) Gold CAD +238.55%
9.5) Gold JPY +232.03%
9.6) Gold AUD +214.54%9
9.7) Gold CHF +177.12%

If you have questions send us a message or contact us

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Privacy Notice

Disclosure

 

Currency ATA 2007 through 2018 (20180509)

Analysis Page Educational Videos & Resources

Performance dates 8 January 2007 through 30 April 2018

Recommended Starting Balance $50,000.00
Cumulative Net Profit
$907,516.71
Maximum Drawdown (50.14%)
($25,068.18)
Best Year 2008 +345.99% $172,992.93
Worst Year 2007 +33.11% $16,555.80
2007-2018 Average +160.15% $80,075.01
2018 +103.69%
$51,842.65

1) Disclosure of Trading Methodology (26:33)

Send a message if you have any questions.

1.1 ) Option Collars
1.2) Working Examples of Collaring Positions
1.3) 7 year Euro Currency chart, monthly, no analysis
1.4) About Bollinger Bands
1.5) Understanding Moving Averages

1.6) 7 year Euro Currency analysis chart, monthly Data
1.7) Technical Opinion (12 secondary indicators)
1.8) Euro Currency March 2015 to June 2015 daily data
1.9) Explaining Call Options (Short and Long)
1.10) Explaining Put Options (Short and Long)

2) Euro-FX – Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (E6)

2.1)   15 year chart using monthly data
2.2)   7 year chart, monthly Data
2.3)   3 year chart, weekly data
2.4)   1 year chart, weekly data
2.5)  
9 month chart, daily data

2.6)   3 month chart, daily data
2.7)  
5 day chart 60 minute data
2.8)   1 day chart, 10 minute data
2.9)   Today’s Technical Opinion
2.10) Ranges & Price Performance
2.11) Support & Resistance
2.12) Barchart Quotes, All Deliveries
2.13) Barchart Options Quotes
2.14) CME Futures Quotes, All Deliveries
2.15) CME Option Quotes

2.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $12.50
2.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 125,000 Euro FX
2.18) EUR Collar Spreadsheet

3) British Pound – Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (B6)

3.1)   15 year chart using monthly data
3.2)   7 year Chart, monthly Data
3.3)   3 year chart, weekly data
3.4)   1 year chart, weekly data
3.5)  
9 month chart, daily data

3.6)   3 month chart, daily data
3.7)  
5 day chart 60 minute data

3.8)   1 day chart, 10 minute data
3.9)   Today’s Technical Opinion
3.10) Ranges & Price Performance
3.11) Support & Resistance
3.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
3.13) Barchart Options Quotes
3.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries

3.15) CME Option Quotes
3.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $6.25
3.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 62,500 Pounds
3.18) GBP Collar Spreadsheet

4) Japanese Yen Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (J6)

4.1)   15 Year chart using monthly data
4.2)   7 Year Chart, monthly Data
4.3)   3 Year chart, weekly data
4.4)   1 year chart, weekly data
4.5)  
9 month chart, daily data

4.6)   3 month chart, daily data
4.7)  
5 day chart, 60 minute data

4.8)   1 day chart, 10 minute data
4.9)   Today’s Technical Opinion
4.10) Ranges & Price Performance
4.11) Support & Resistance
4.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
4.13) Barchart Options Quotes
4.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
4.15) CME Option Quotes

4.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $12.50
4.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 12,500,000 Yen
4.18) JPY Collar Spreadsheet

5) Australian Dollar Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (A6)

5.1)   15 Year chart using monthly data
5.2)   7 Year Chart, monthly Data
5.3)   3 Year chart, weekly data
5.4)   1 year chart, weekly data
5.5)  
9 month chart, daily data

5.6)   3 month chart, daily data
5.7)  
5 day chart 60 minute data

5.8)   1 day chart, 10 minute data
5.9)   Today’s Technical Opinion
5.10) Ranges & Price Performance
5.11) Support & Resistance
5.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
5.13) Barchart Options Quotes
5.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
5.15) CME Option Quotes
5.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $10.00
5.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 100,000 Australian
5.18) AUD Collar Spreadsheet

6) Canadian Dollar Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (D6)

6.1)   15 Year chart using monthly data
6.2)   7 Year Chart, monthly Data
6.3)   3 Year chart, weekly data
6.4)   1 year chart, weekly data
6.5)  
9 month chart, daily data

6.6)   3 month chart, daily data
6.7)  
5 day chart 60 minute data

6.8)   1 day chart, 10 minute data
6.9)   Today’s Technical Opinion
6.10) Ranges & Price Performance
6.11) Support & Resistance
6.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
6.13) Barchart Options Quotes
6.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
6.15) CME Option Quotes
6.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $10.00
6.17) Exchange margin requirement per 100,000 Canadian
6.18) CAD Collar Spreadsheet

7) Swiss Franc Today’s Technical Opinion Symbol (S6) (not traded)

7.1)   15 Year chart using monthly data
7.2)   7 Year Chart, monthly Data
7.3)   3 Year chart, weekly data
7.4)   1 year chart, weekly data
7.5)  
9 month chart, daily data

7.6)   3 month chart, daily data
7.7)  
5 day chart 60 minute data

7.8)   1 day chart, 10 minute data
7.9)   Today’s Technical Opinion
7.10) Ranges & Price Performance
7.11) Support & Resistance
7.12) Barchart Quotes All Deliveries
7.13) Barchart Options Quotes
7.14) CME Futures Quotes All Deliveries
7.15) CME Option Quotes

7.16) Contract Specifications each 0.01 = $12.50
7.17) Exchange Margin Requirement per 125,000 Swiss

8) Program Structure and Account Opening Procedure

8.1) (ATA’s), What They Are and How They Work
8.2) The Fee Structure For This Program
8.3) Defining Overall Risk For Your Account
8.4) How Balances Are Guaranteed Plus or Minus Trading
8.5) How To Open An Account

9) Educational Resources

9.1)   Basics of the Futures Markets
9.2)   Basics of Futures Options
9.3)   Fundamentals and FX Futures
9.4)   Trading the FX Markets
9.5)   Australian Dollar Futures
9.6)   British Pound Futures
9.7)   Canadian Dollar Futures
9.8)   Japanese Yen Futures
9.9)   Euro FX Futures
9.10) Introduction to Order Types

9.11) Detailed Description of Order Types With Examples
9.12) Understanding Futures Margin Requirements
9.13) Understanding Moving Averages
9.14) About Bollinger Bands & How to Set Them
9.15)
Understanding Support and Resistance

9.16) Defining Trend, Trade Duration & Number of Contracts Traded
9.17) Explaining Call Options (Short and Long)
9.18) Explaining Put Options (Short and Long)
9.19) Option Collars
9.20) Working Examples of Collaring Positions
9.21) What is the European Central Bank?
9.22) Understanding FX Quote Conventions
9.23) FX Futures Pricing and Basis
9.24) Understanding the FX Delivery & Settlement Process
9.25) Hedging FX Risk
9.26) A Look at FX Exchange For Physical (EFP)
9.27) FX Spot Markets vs. Currency Futures
9.28)
Test this strategy on any of these 17 related and unrelated markets

10) Major Curencies Priced In Gold

10.1) Gold GBP +334.23%
10.2) Gold USD +279.19%
10.3) Gold EUR +254.05%
10.4) Gold CAD +238.55%
10.5) Gold JPY +232.03%
10.6) Gold AUD +214.54%9
10.7) Gold CHF +177.12%

11) United States Fundamentals 2003 – 2018

11.1)   US Median Income +4.4%
11.2)   US Median Income Paid In Gold -71.46%
11.3)   Official US Consumer Price Index +37.34%
11.4)   Median Home Price +70.92%
11.5)   Mortgage Debt +41.89%
11.6)   Median Rent +54.20%
11.7)   Grocery PPI +64.40%
11.8)   Consumer Healthcare +87.40%
11.9)   Federal Health Care Expenditures Per Capita +168.65%
11.10) Federal Pension Expenditures Per Capita +90.94%
11.11) Federal Social Insurance Taxes +47.18%
11.12) Federal Spending Per Capita +70.54
11.13) Federal Revenue Per Capita +62.30%
11.14) Federal Debt +202.10%
11.15) US Debt Service Cost +44.03%
11.16) Balance of trade -8.52 Trillion USD
11.17) Gold USD +279.19%
11.18) The S&P priced in gold 23.86%

11.19) The Only Solution To The US Debt Crisis

12) Other Markets Traded Using This Strategy

12.1) U.S. Futures markets
12.2) European Futures markets
12.3) Any stock in the S&P 500 with options liquidity

12.4) Any of the top 100 performing stocks with options liquidity

If you have questions send us a message or contact us

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Privacy Notice

Disclosure

 

Gold Bull and Bear 1979 though 2018

January 1979 $224.10 to January 1980 $873.00 = + 289.56% (using Daily data)
January 1980 $873.00 to June 1982 $301.00 = – 65.52% (using weekly data)
June 1982 $301.00 to February 1983 $514.00 = +41.44%
(using daily data)
February 1983 $514.00 to March 1985 $290.10 = -43.56% (using weekly data)
March 1985$290.10 to December 1987 $479.80 = +39.33% (using weekly data)

December 1987 $479.80 to September 1989 $365.20
= -23.88% (using daily data)

 

 

 

 

Gold ATA Performance 2005-2018

Introduction (6:23)

Analysis Page   Educational Videos   Metals (19)    Futures (58)   Options (34)

Performance 1 March 2005 through 30 April 2018

Recommended Starting Balance $25,000.00
Cumulative Net Profit
$341,025.25
Maximum Drawdown (49.10%)
($12,276.00)
Best Year 2008 +237.96% $59,490.00
Worst Year 2007 +16.75% $4,187.00
2005-2018 Average +103.60% $25,900.67
2018 +29.26%
$7,314.60

About Performance

Monthly and Annual Performance

Disclosure

1) Full Disclosure of what we’re trading and how (21:09)

1) Gold Symbol (GC)

1.1)   20 Year chart using monthly data
1.2)   10 Year Chart, monthly Data
1.3)   3 Year chart, weekly data
1.4)   9 month chart, daily data
1.5)   10 day chart 60 minute data (notify us here if you can’t access)
1.6)   Today’s using 5 minute data  (notify us here if you can’t access)
1.7)   Today’s Technical Opinion 
1.8)   Ranges & Price Performance 
1.9)   Support & Resistance
1.10) Barchart Quotes, All Deliveries 
1.11) Barchart Options Quotes
1.12) CME Futures Quotes, All Deliveries
1.13) CME Option Quotes

1.14) Contract Specifications  each 1.00 = $100.00
1.15) Exchange Margin Requirement
1.16) Metals Analysis Page

2) Educational

2.1)   Basics of the Futures Markets
2.2)   Basics of Futures Options
2.3)   Gold Futures Video
2.4)   Gold Educational Videos and Links
2.5)   Introduction to Order Types
2.6)   Detailed Description of Order Types With Examples
2.7)   Understanding Futures Margin Requirements
2.8)   Understanding Moving Averages
2.9)   Understanding Support and Resistance
2.10) About Bollinger Bands & How to Set Them
2.11) Defining Trend, Trade Duration & Number of Contracts Traded
2.12) Explaining Call Options (Short and Long)
2.13) Explaining Put Options (Short and Long)
2.14) Option Collars
2.15) Working Examples of Collaring Positions and Potential Profit/Loss
2.16) 20 year chart of the S&P Priced in Gold
2.17) Test this strategy on any of these 17 related and unrelated markets

3) Program Structure and Account Opening Procedure

3.1) (ATA’s), What They Are and How They Work
3.2) The Fee Structure For This Program
3.3) Defining Overall Risk For Your Account Before the First Trade Goes On
3.4) How Balances Are Guaranteed Plus or Minus Trading Activity
3.5)
How To Open An Account

4) Primary Metals Exchanges

4.1) Chicago Mercantile Exchange/Comex
4.2) Additional Gold trading Information From the CME

5) Other Markets Traded Using This Strategy

5.1) U.S. Futures markets
5.2) European Futures markets
5.3) Any stock in the S&P 500 with options liquidity

5.4) Any of the top 100 performing stocks with options liquidity 

6) May 2003 to May 2018 (online review reference links)

Gold priced in major currencies
6.1)  Gold GBP +334.23%
6.2)  Gold USD +279.19%
6.3)  Gold EUR +254.05%
6.4)  Gold CAD +238.55%
6.5)  Gold JPY  +232.03%
6.6)  Gold AUD +214.54%
6.7)  Gold CHF +177.12%

Stock Indices
6.8)   Dax +298.11% priced in EUR
6.9)   S&P +176.53% priced USD
6.10) FTSE 100 +91.96% priced in GBP
6.11) Euro Stoxx 50 +50.09% priced in EUR

Energy Prices in USD
6.12) New York Heating Oil +186.67%
6.13) New York Crude Oil +137.93%
6.14) Gasoline +73.13%

7) United States Fundamentals 2003 – 2018

4.1) US Median Income +4.4%
4.2) US Median Income Paid In Gold  -71.46%
4.3) Official US Consumer Price Index +37.34%
4.4) Median Home Price +70.92%
4.5) Mortgage Debt +41.89%
4.6)  Median Rent +54.20%
4.7)  Grocery PPI +64.40%
4.8)  Consumer Healthcare +87.40%
4.9)  Federal Health Care Expenditures Per Capita +168.65%
4.10) Federal Pension Expenditures Per Capita +90.94%
4.11) Federal Social Insurance Taxes +47.18%
4.12) Federal Spending Per Capita +70.54
4.13) Federal Revenue Per Capita +62.30%
4.14) Federal Debt +202.10%
4.15) US Debt Service Cost +44.03%
4.16) Balance of trade  -8.52 Trillion USD
4.17) Gold USD +279.19%
4.18) The S&P priced in gold  23.86%
4.19) The Only Solution To The US Debt Crisis

If you have questions send us a message  or contact us

Regards,
Peter Knight Advisor

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Privacy Notice

Disclosure

 

 

 

 

Automated Trading Accounts (ATA’s) what they are and how they work

Gold ATA Performance Homepage

1) About This ATA

2.1) As our ATA Client you maintain control of

  • The market(s) you trade and when
  • The methodologies you trade
  • The level of leverage that suits your risk tolerance
  • The overall risk for your account

2.2) ATA Team responsibilities include

  • Calculating entries, trade risk levels and profit objectives
  • Placing all orders and diligently overseeing executions, positions and balance
  • Monitoring total account risk to ensure it is within your defined guidelines
  • Ensuring everything is done correctly and assuming liability if it’s not
  • Answering all your questions on markets and methodologies

2.3) About this ATA

  • This ATA uses fully disclosed trading methodology
  • Trades with the trend long or short
  • Uses option collars that define risk on every trade and duration of every trading period
  • Trades in this ATA cannot be stopped out regardless of market volatility
  • The only way a position can be called away is at a profit
  • If the market stays the same this ATA hasn’t wasted precious investment capital on purchasing option time premium as it is collecting approximately as much  time premium on the covered writes (at the profit objectives), as it’s paying out on the purchased options that define maximum trade risk
  • Option collars can be offset at any time locking in gains and/or modified to capture more of the move or, reversed to capture a trend reversal
  • Mark-to-market positions and balance are available online at any time
  • Statements are emailed daily disclosing positions, liquidating value and any trading activity
  • Monthly statements summarize all activity and end of month balance
  • Liquidity for ATA accounts in portion or all is 2 to 48 hours in any major currency
  • AIM ATA’s afford you the opportunity to modify markets, units you trade and your overall account risk level at any time
  • Other markets we trade ATA’s on in North America and Europe
  • Contact us with your questions
  • Schedule an online review

If you have questions send us a message or  schedule an online review.

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17 Related and Unrelated Markets

To demonstrate the durability of the EMA9 and Opinion try using them on any of the related and unrelated markets linked below.

1)   Last 10 EuroStoxx  
2)   Opinion

3)  
Last 10 FTSE 100 monthly O/H/L/C

4)   FTSE opinion

5)  
Last 10 DAX Index monthly O/H/L/C

6)   DAX Index opinion

7)  
Last 10 Gold monthly O/H/L/C

8)   Gold opinion

9)  
Last 10 Euro monthly O/H/L/C

10) Euro opinion

11)
Last 10 British Pound monthly O/H/L/C

12) British Pound opinion

13) Last 10 Australian dollar monthly O/H/L/C
14) Australian Dollar opinion

15) Last 10 Canadian dollar monthly O/H/L/C
16) Canadian Dollar opinion

17) Last 10 Brazilian Real monthly O/H/L/C
18) Brazilian Real opinion

19) Last 10 Russian Ruble monthly O/H/L/C
20) Russian Ruble opinion

21) Last 10 on 2 year US Treasuries monthly O/H/L/C
22) 10 Year Treasury opinion

23) Last 10 Euro Bund  monthly O/H/L/C
24) Euro Bund opinion

25) Last 10 NY Crude Oil monthly O/H/L/C
26) Crude Oil opinion

27) Last 10 Copper monthly O/H/L/C
28) Copper opinion

29)
Last 10 Lumber monthly O/H/L/C

30) Lumber opinion

31) Last 10 Cotton monthly O/H/L/C
32) Cotton opinion

33) Last 10 Orange Juice monthly O/H/L/C
34) Orange Juice opinion

Identifying the trend is only 1/3rd of the battle to win the war of becoming a profitable trader, the other 2/3rds is how you structure your trades.

For full disclosure of how we set profit objectives and define risk on every trade and for the duration of every trading period see this link.

If you have questions send us a message or schedule an online review .

Regards,
Peter Knight Advisor

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What are Bollinger Bands & How To Set Them

1) To set a Bollinger Band open this chart page
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2) Choose Add Technical Study
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3) Choose Bollinger Band
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4)
To set your Bands, click on the default parameter
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5) The menu will open set your period and width
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6) About Bollinger Bands

Bollinger Bands are a technical trading tool created by John Bollinger in the early 1980s. They arose from the need for adaptive trading bands and the observation that volatility was dynamic, not static as was widely believed at the time.

​Bollinger Bands can be applied in all the financial markets including equities, forex, commodities, and futures. Bollinger Bands can be used in most time frames, from very short-term periods, to hourly, daily, weekly or monthly.

Bollinger Bands answer a question: Are prices high or low on a relative basis? By definition price is high at the upper band and price is low at the lower band. That bit of information is incredibly valuable. It is even more powerful if combined with other tools such as other indicators for confirmation. Learn  how to use this powerful tool in the Bollinger Band Knowledge section

John Bollinger  “What are Bollinger Bands?”

Bollinger Bands are a technical analysis tool, specifically they are a type of trading band or envelope. Trading bands and envelopes serve the same purpose, they provide relative definitions of high and low that can be used to create rigorous trading approaches, in pattern recognition, and for much more. Bands are usually thought of as employing a measure of central tendency as a base such as a moving average, whereas envelopes encompass the price structure without a clearly defined central focus, perhaps by reference to highs and lows, or via cyclic analysis. We’ll use the term trading bands to refer to any set of curves that market technicians use to define high or low on a relative basis.

The earliest example of trading bands that I have been able to uncover comes from Wilfrid Ledoux in 1960. He used curves connecting the monthly highs and lows of the Dow Jones Industrial Average as a long-term market-timing tool. After Ledoux the exact sequence of trading band development gets foggy. In 1960 Chester Keltner proposed a trading system, The 10-Day Moving Average Rule, which later became Keltner bands in the hands of market technicians whose names we do not know. Next comes the work of J. M. Hurst who used cycles to draw envelopes around the price structure. Hurst’s work was so elegant that it became a sort of grail with many trying to replicate it, but few succeeding. In the early ’70s percentage bands became very popular, though we have no idea who created them. They were simply a moving average shifted up and down by a user-specified percent. Percentage bands had the decided advantage of being easy to deploy by hand. At any given time a 7% band consists of a base moving average, an upper curve at 107% of the base and a lower curve at 93% of the base. (Arthur Merrill suggested multiply and dividing by one plus the desired percentage.) When I started using trading bands percentage bands were the most popular bands by far. Along the way we got another fine example of envelopes, Donchian bands, which consist of the highest high and lowest low of the immediately prior n-days. Those are the main types of band/envelopes that I know of. Over the years there have been many variations on those ideas, some of which are still in use. Today the most popular approaches to trading bands are Donchian, Keltner, Percentage and, of course, Bollinger Bands.

Percentage bands are fixed, they do not adapt to changing market conditions; Donchian bands use recent highs and lows and Keltner bands use Average True Range as adaptive mechanisms. Bollinger Bands use standard deviation to adapt to changing market conditions and thereby hangs a tale. When I became active in the markets on a full time basis in 1980 I was mainly interested in options and technical analysis. Information on both was hard to obtain in those days but I persisted; with the help of an early microcomputer I was able to make some progress. At the time we used percentage bands and compared price action within the bands to the action of supply/demand tools like David Bostian’s Intraday Intensity. A touch of the upper band by price that was not confirmed by strength in the oscillator was a sell setup and a similarly unconfirmed tag of the lower band was a buy setup. The problem with that approach was that percentage bands needed to be adjusted over time to keep them germane to the price structure and the adjustment process let emotions into the analytical process. If you were bullish, you had a natural tendency to draw the bands so they presented a bullish picture, if you were bearish the natural result was a picture with a bearish bias. This was clearly a problem. We tried reset rules like lookbacks with some success, but what we really needed was an adaptive mechanism. I was trading options at the time and had built some volatility models in an early spreadsheet program called SuperCalc. One day I copied a volatility formula down a column of data and noticed that volatility was changing over time. Seeing that, I wondered if volatility couldn’t be used to set the width of trading bands. That idea may seem obvious now, but at the time it was a leap of faith. At that time volatility was thought to be a static quantity, a property of a security, and that if it changed at all, it did so only in a very long-term sense, over the life of a company for example. Today we know the volatility is a dynamic quantity, indeed very dynamic.

After some experimentation I settled on the formulation we know today, an n period moving average with bands drawn above and below at intervals determined by a multiple of standard deviation (We use the population calculation for standard deviation). The defaults today are the same as they were 35 years ago, 20 periods for the moving average with the bands set at plus and minus two standard deviations of the same data used for the average. But they weren’t “Bollinger Bands” yet, that would come later when Bill Griffeth, an on-air host for the Financial News Network, asked me what I called my bands on air. I had presented a chart showing an unconfirmed tag of my upper band and explained that the first down day would generate a sell signal. Bill then asked me what I called those lines around the price structure, a question that I was totally unprepared for, so I blurted out the alliteratively obvious choice: “Bollinger Bands.”

So what are Bollinger Bands? They are curves drawn in and around the price structure usually consisting of a moving average (the middle band), an upper band, and a lower band that answer the question as to whether prices are high or low on a relative basis. Bollinger Bands work best when the middle band is chosen to reflect the intermediate-term trend, so that trend information is combined with relative price level data.

Soon the Bollinger Bands had company, I created %b, an indicator that depicted where price was in relation to the bands, and then I added BandWidth to depict how wide the bands were as a function of the middle band. For many years that was the state of the art: Bollinger Bands, %b and BandWidth. Here are a couple of practical examples of the usage of Bollinger Bands and the classic Bollinger Band tools along with a volume indicator, Intraday Intensity:

Bollinger Band Website

If you have questions send us a message or schedule an online review .

Regards,
Peter Knight Advisor

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